Alexa Chung’s Twitter Account Hacked By NFT Community

As reported by NME, Alexa Chung’s Twitter account appears to have been hacked by a collective of NFT scammers. The TV presenter seemed to tweet from her official account to her 1.3million followers Monday afternoon with a giveaway on behalf of an NFT community called Azuki.

“GIVING AWAY THIS AZUKI NFT ($23,239) To enter – Follow me with [notifications on] – RT & like this – Tag 3 friends,” the post reads. Additional tweets have been posted from Chung’s account, one reading “Who has my notifications on?” and “Like if active, this is a test”, but it remains unclear whether Chung has regained control of her account.

Chung’s bio was also changed today, now reading: “simply a degen, marketing expert • DM For Promotions.” Representatives for Chung confirmed she had been hacked after being contacted by Rolling Stone UK – although there has been no word from Chung herself, nor an admission from Azuki.

Experts Comments

February 02, 2022
Jake Moore
Cybersecurity Specialist
ESET

Celebrities are often hot targets with their huge followings, which increases the chances of influencing victims who may be quick to act on their advice. NFTs are progressively becoming the new buzzword and their air of mystery is drumming up huge interest. Hacking twitter accounts can be difficult with multi-factor authentication turned on but it is still possible with relentless attacks by threat actors. The most common way that cybercriminals bypass security measures is through social

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Celebrities are often hot targets with their huge followings, which increases the chances of influencing victims who may be quick to act on their advice. NFTs are progressively becoming the new buzzword and their air of mystery is drumming up huge interest. Hacking twitter accounts can be difficult with multi-factor authentication turned on but it is still possible with relentless attacks by threat actors. The most common way that cybercriminals bypass security measures is through social engineering the victim with targeted phishing and smishing communications, or via a SIM swap attack. The stronger way to protect a Twitter account is to turn off SMS-based multi factor authentication and apply an authenticator app to generate the one time password, and to never give it to anyone else.

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