Microsoft-owned LinkedIn is being used by hackers to spread data stealing malware via sending connection requests in disguise of people working with reputed companies, a report showed on Tuesday. Researchers found that scammers are exploiting LinkedIn’s chat and job posting features to share links/files that are laced with stealer malware. Since most LinkedIn users accept any and all connection requests they receive, scammers can easily make connections and build credibility on the platform. After building credibility, the actors share malicious files and links, which are then opened by unsuspecting victims. Once opened, a stealer malware is deployed on the victim’s system, from which it steals passwords, credit card information, and other sensitive data, and sends it to the threat actors.

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Jake Moore
Jake Moore , Cybersecurity Specialist
InfoSec Expert
August 30, 2022 12:28 pm

LinkedIn is not only a powerful business tool but it’s becoming more of a social media platform than just for professional use. With this in mind, cyberciminals have naturally taken advantage of this and are attempting to exploit users who may be too quick to click on connections. Attachments and links on LinkedIn messaging must be treated as cautiously as you would treat unsolicited emails. People often view messages via LinkedIn with more verification and a sense of credibility which can affect the safety of the victim with their guard down.

Last edited 27 days ago by Jake Moore
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