Stupid Facebook Mistake Finally Catches Malicious Hacker With 1 Million Stolen Identities

Another twisted tale from the research team at Check Point has been published on May 28, detailing its investigation to expose the real identity of an infamous super-hacker responsible for attacks on 5,000 websites, the theft of the private data for a least a million people, and the sale of stolen credit cards. Despite the thefts, the UGNazi-affiliated hacker pushed an anti-establishment message, but he was caught after making a stupidly simple mistake on Facebook.

Experts Comments

May 29, 2020
Chris Hauk
Consumer Privacy Champion
Pixel Privacy
Kudos to the research team at Check Point for staying vigilant and persisting in its investigation into "VandaTheGod." While it seems ironic that a hacker will be tripped up by such a simple mistake like leaving a Facebook tab open in their browser, it proves that hackers are human too, and can occasionally trip themselves up. As a security advocate, I applaud the efforts of the Check Point team, as well as those of similar groups.
May 29, 2020
Paul Bischoff
Privacy Advocate
Comparitech
Most good hackers take great care to never leave a trace. Those who boast about their exploits will leave clues and eventually get caught. It's not a surprising ending. A bigger question is why social networks like Twitter allowed him to openly brag about his criminal activity. Twitter's rules (https://help.twitter.com/en/rules-and-policies/twitter-rules) don't explicitly disallow posts depicting criminal activity. But if he was making money by hacking websites and stealing data, then that.....Read More
Most good hackers take great care to never leave a trace. Those who boast about their exploits will leave clues and eventually get caught. It's not a surprising ending. A bigger question is why social networks like Twitter allowed him to openly brag about his criminal activity. Twitter's rules (https://help.twitter.com/en/rules-and-policies/twitter-rules) don't explicitly disallow posts depicting criminal activity. But if he was making money by hacking websites and stealing data, then that might fall under the rule against illegal or certain regulated goods or services. The rule states, "You may not use our service for any unlawful purpose or in furtherance of illegal activities.  Read Less
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